6 Edible Ways To Celebrate Dia de los Muertos

Every year on Nov. 1 and 2, Mexico celebrates Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), a holiday that honors family and loved ones who have passed. Instead of focusing on the past, those who celebrate Day of the Dead lavishly decorate and hang by their departed’s grave site while enjoying the deceased’s favorite foods and drinks. If you want to celebrate Día de los Muertos, take a tip from these 6 traditional and non-tranditonal recipes your friends and familia will love.

 

Ver más: 7 Dia de los Muertos Sugar Skull Tutorials

Pan de Muerto

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Spanish for “bread of the dead,” pan de muerto is a traditional sweet bread, shaped into a bun and topped with additional dough made to look like bones before baking. The bones represent the lost soul and are represented in a circle to portray the circle of life. Sweet and buttery pan de muerto is topped with dough that’s shaped to remind us of skeletons.

Try the recipe for pan de muerto by Muy Bueno Cookbook.

 

Sugar Skull Cookies with Royal Icing

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Sugar skulls are a classic symbol of Dia de los Muertos and now you can eat them in cookie form! Sweet Sugar Belle breaks down a few traditional patterns and offers tips and suggestions for beautifully decorated skull-shaped cookies.

Try the recipe for skull sugar cookies with royal icing Sweet Sugar Belle.

 

Horchata

horchata

Served over ice, this traditional Mexican beverage made of almonds, rice, and cinnamon is sweet and refreshing.

Try the recipe for horchata by NoshOn.It.

 

Day of the Dead Marshmallow Sugar Skull Pops

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Marshmallows are the perfect canvas to decorate your own sugar skull pops. Decorating marshmallow pops is an easy and tasty way to teach your kids about this special celebration in a way that’s fun and full of color.

Try the recipe for Day of the Dead marshmallows by Mom.me.

 

Devil’s Hammer

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A drink made with tequila and agave nectar that will send shivers down your spine.

 

Try the recipe for devil’s hammer by Hispanic Kitchen.

 

Calabaza En Tacha (Candied Pumpkin)

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Slow simmered, Calabaza En Tacha is served as a traditional dessert, but could be served as a side dish, like candied yams. Served with whipped cream, this dessert is simply irresistible!

 

Try the recipe for candied pumpkin by Pati’s Mexican Table.

 

Photos via: Muy Bueno Cookbook, Sweet Sugar Belle, NoshOn.It, Mom.me, Hispanic Kitchen, Pati’s Mexican Table. 

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